21 Reasons that it might be time for YOU to Take Action

The answers you are seeking are lying dormant waiting to be released.

Have you ever:

  • Participated in conversations about the behavior of certain titled leaders?
  • Expressed frustration at situations that seem corrupt, not in line with core values or unfair?
  • Wondered why opportunities to problem solve and improve the future were not taken?

Have you ever spoken these words, “Why doesn’t “someone” do something?”  

When the change you want to see isn’t happening “out there”… 

Culture or Harassment: Are You Defending Your POV or Listening?

When was the last time you listened first?

I was facilitating a workshop for students. The goal was to help everyone identify the bubbles they live in, and to encourage them to strategically pop those bubbles.

I asked questions that encouraged laughter:

  • What is the craziest food you have ever eaten? Answers varied from peas to snake… (Yes for some of us, eating vegetables is crazy!)

Then questions that would help them think about their courage:

Beyond the puzzle piece: Why the whole picture is so important

In workplaces and nations

ONE piece of a puzzle

A friend recently had an appointment with a doctor. The doctor started to prescribe medicine to treat the symptoms of a gut issue.

So the patient advocated for herself. She reminded the doctor that she has additional medical issues that are bigger than the gut issue. She has osteoporosis and needs a stronger skeletal system and this medicine will make her bones weaker.

The doctor heard her concern and thoughtfully responded, “Well, I guess you need to look at the whole picture.”

At work and in our world is easy to focus on one piece of the puzzle:

Would you employ, elect or reelect someone like this?

We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them. -Albert Einstein

I walked around the corner and into the office. The moment I saw her, I knew I was going to employ her. A high performing employee had referred her.   She was professionally attired, already chatting with others on the team, and I knew that she had an impressive resume.

In spite of everything that looked so positive, I kept the interview consistent with all others. And not surprisingly, she soared through the first few questions.

And then I asked my favorite one.